Zombie Democracy – Apartheid Fort NZ

World's Deadliest Tourist Destination! [Chinese triads, Thai sex traffickers, low IQ migs, peds, hitmen… welcome!]

You had a right to protest in Darkland?

Posted by te2ataria on April 12, 2011

Gunboat Democracy!

Whoever gave you the idea Fort NZ tolerated human rights or the right to protest?

New Zealand Gestapo and the paramilitary police force are using the naval inshore patrol vessel HMNZS Pukaki [Puke-akin] to monitor the protests.

New Zealand Gestapo has also served notice that any protester trying to block oil exploration off the East Cape would face fines of up to $10,000, a year in prison, or probably both.

For good measure, the Gestapo van driver might knee you in the groin on your way to prison from the district kangaroo courthouse.

So, be smart and keep away from The Orient Explorer and the rest of them “research vessels” with Petrobras name.


Pukaki: The role of this naval vessel is NOT to fight foreign enemies, but to oppress protesters.

The Brazilian state-owned oil company is carrying out seismic research in the Raukumara Basin under a 5-year licence granted by our beloved Government, according  to a report.

During the weekend swimmers from a Greenpeace-led protest flotilla forced the ship off course by swimming close to it. No action was taken against them but police this afternoon visited the protest fleet in navy rigid-hull inflatable boats and served the skippers notices under the Maritime Transport Act, warning them to stay at least 200m away from the Orient Explorer and a second Petrobras vessels, Ocean Pioneer, or face a fine of up to $10,000 or 12 months in prison.

Surprise!

Greenpeace says the Government is putting financial interests of an international oil company ahead of local people.

“We are very concerned at the use of military services to intervene in this protest and very concerned that the Government is meddling in police matters,” Greenpeace climate campaigner Steve Abel said.

What does the local iwi Say?

Petrobras had met East Cape iwi Te Whanau a Apanui, which opposes the project, and would continue to engage with it.

“They haven’t given us the permission to drill, but they give us the opportunity to be friends,” Petrobras asset manager Marco Toledo said.

Could it be because Te Whanau a Apanui are worried about the environmental impact?

Can Petrobras guarantee there would be no adverse environmental effects if drilling went ahead?

“Guarantee is a word that does not exist in our industry, in the industry in general,” he said.

And if you don’t believe him look at the BP rape of Gulf of Mexico, or the Tokyo Electric wholesale disaster in Japan.

Did John Key have anything to say?

Prime Minister John Key has been wondering since when a “bunch of hippies” are worried about environmental issues. He told reporters he trusted the police to balance the rights of Petrobras and the protesters, “saying it was no different to a protest on dry land”, the report said.

He means since the police INVARIABLY uses the military against protesters on dry land, why the heck shouldn’t they also use them on the high seas!

3 Responses to “You had a right to protest in Darkland?”

  1. te2ataria said

    Iwi to complain to UN about oil surveying

    Maori iwi tonight have decided to officially complain to the United Nations over the Government’s decision to allow a South American company to survey for oil off the coast of the East Cape.

    Te Whanau a Apanui met with legal teams and Greenpeace protesters to consider their options in response to the Orient Explorer, owned by Brazilian state-owned oil company Petrobras, carrying out seismic testing in the Raukumara Basin under a five-year licence granted by the Government.

    Lawyers representing the iwi plan to take a legal strategy based on indigenous rights to the United Nations in response to the surveying.

    “We will be taking this issue to the United Nations and getting some spotlight on New Zealand’s obligations to us under the Treaty of Waitangi. We think New Zealand has failed in that,” lawyer Dayle Takitumu told NZPA.

    Te Whanau a Apanui would also be pursuing domestic avenues, one of which would be taking a judicial review to the High Court.

    “The decision to grant the permit (for surveying) without going through the proper process for consultation is what we are exploring at the moment. We will be moving on this within days.”

    Ms Takitumu said the Human Rights Committee and the United Nations would be petitioned to make an advisory and objective opinion on the matter though a binding judgement was not possible.

    Greenpeace protestors were still in the water tonight despite police warnings and had received overwhelming support from the public, spokesman Dean Baigent-Mercer said.

    Police yesterday visited the protest fleet in navy rigid-hull inflatable boats and served the skippers notices under the Maritime Transport Act, warning them to stay at least 200m away from the Orient Explorer and a second Petrobras vessel, Ocean Pioneer, or face a fine of up to $10,000 or 12 months in prison.

    Petrobras New Zealand project head Marco Toledo said yesterday the company had met with East Cape iwi Te Whanau a Apanui, and would continue to engage with it.

    “They haven’t given us the permission to drill, but they gave us the opportunity to be friends.”

    The Orient Explorer had collected some data but the research phase would take three-and-a-half years and the protest would not disrupt the long-term plan.
    Mr Toledo said he could not guarantee there would be no adverse environmental effects if drilling went ahead. Copyright NZPA

  2. te2ataria said

    Navy intervention in oil protest “disgusting” – Maori MPs

    Maori MPs have condemned naval help with police intervention against Petrobras protestors off the East Cape, calling it “bloody disgusting” and similar to Libyan tactics.

    The Orient Explorer, owned by Brazilian state-owned oil company Petrobras, is carrying out Government-sanctioned seismic testing in the Raukumara Basin and at the weekend was the target of protest — swimmers from a Greenpeace protest flotilla forced the ship off course.

    Police this afternoon visited the protest fleet in navy rigid-hull inflatable boats and served notices under the Maritime Transport Act that they should stay at least 200m away from the ship or face a fine of up to $10,000 or 12 months in prison.

    The Maori Party condemned the presence of the navy and reiterated its disappointed that two East Coast iwi, Te Whanau A Apanui and Ngati Porou, were left out of the Petrobras permit consultation process in June last year.

    But Acting Minister of Energy and Resources Hekia Parata said “that was simply untrue” as iwi were invited to contribute to the process.

    Independent MP Hone Harawira said it was “bloody disgusting” police were now mobilising the Royal New Zealand Navy.

    He compared the action to Bastion Point and Parihaka — two historic movements in Maori activism.

    “What’s happening there is exactly the same, it’s the Crown moving against Maori for daring to defend their rights.

    “This is a major historical event.”

    Maori Party MP for Waiariki, Te Ururoa Flavell, said sending the navy was similar to Libya using the military against its own people.

    “It is totally over the for the Government to be using Navy resources in this way.”

    He said the Government must put the permit on hold until consultation with iwi has taken place.

    Petrobras held one meeting last weekend, but he said it was not enough.

    Police earlier defended the use of the naval inshore patrol vessel HMNZS Pukaki to monitor the protests, saying their own boats could not operate so far out. The priority was to ensure the protests were conducted safely without interrupting Petrobras’ right to conduct testing.

    Petrobras asset manager Marco Toledo told reporters in Wellington today the company had met East Cape iwi Te Whanau a Apanui and would continue to engage with it.

    “They haven’t given us the permission to drill, but they give us the opportunity to be friends,” Mr Toledo said.

    He denied claims the company was ignoring Maori.

    The Orient Explorer had collected some data but was now in “standby” and would resume testing when it was safe to do so.

    The research phase would take three and a half years and the protest would not disrupt the long-term plan.

    Prime Minister John Key said he had not taken advice on whether it was illegal to sabotage New Zealand’s economic interests.

    “What I can say is, quite clearly, we are a Government that believes there are opportunities in the oil and gas exploration field.”
    Labour leader Phil Goff said there needed to be better consultation with local people, and the Government needed to give more reassurance about oil and gas exploration.
    Copyright NZPA

  3. Tang said

    [As New Zealand police is incompetent and corrupt, the government has decided that the day to day police work should be carried out by the SIS. Right??!! Moderator]

  4. Terry said

    As iff the [foreign] pm of this banana republic giv a stuff about people and or any rights as iff we hav any. He and his cohorts hav a band of military murderers and a corrupt police farce to carry out their new world order plans….Pathetic..Wake up sheeple!

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