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Safe in New Zealand: Havelock North gastro followed by E. coli contamination in Hastings

Posted by te2ataria on August 20, 2016

Sent by a concerned reader

WTF: Victims of Havelock North gastro outbreak could develop auto-immune disease

Small number of people hit by Havelock North campylobacter outbreak could develop a serious neurological condition called Guillain-Barre Syndrome, says Professor Michael Baker, a leading public health academic of the department of public health at Otago University.

“Guillain-Barre Syndrome, or GBS, sees the body’s immune system attack nerves that control movement and feeling. It develops one to two weeks after a campylobacter infection,” said a report.

Hastings water contaminated

“Test results this afternoon for the Hastings town supply produced positive results for E. coli bacteria. E. coli can be an indicator of faecal contamination and can cause gastric illness.

“Hastings’ water, supplied from an underground aquifer, is quite separate from the Havelock North town supply which was found to have been contaminated with campylobacter and led to more than 4000 people falling ill with symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhoea, fever, headaches and muscle pain,” according to a report.

Exposure to Toxic Poisoning in New Zealand Lakes and Waterways

New Zealand’s intensive animal industries produce about 4 times more manure than could safely be used as fertilizer, said a report.

New Zealand farmers used a total of 820,000 tons of fertilizers to their croplands in 1999 (204 kg/ha of cropland each year, about twice as much as the U.S. and 220 percent of the world average). New Zealand also uses about twice as much pesticides per hectare of cropland (2,215 kg/ha, 1996 data – more recent data not available.) than the U.S.

South Canterbury has highest rates of gastro illnesses in the South Island

“South Canterbury’s high rate of gastro illness is attributed to the high number of people in physical contact with farm animals either through work or on lifestyle blocks”, said a report.

The statistics (based on per 100,000 population) show 250 cases of campylobacteriosis for South Canterbury (compared to 180 nationally), 28 cryptosporidiosis (compared to 18 nationally), and 50 salmonellosis (compared to 22 nationally)

 

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