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Posts Tagged ‘Carwyn Kawana’

I Want My Rent!

Posted by te2ataria on March 5, 2010

Carwyn Kawana says he will confiscate goods from shop, again, until they pay the rent

A Maori activist who claims to own Palmerston North is not amused by the offer to drop  “shoplifting charge” against him.

Let’s face it if you didn’t pay your mortgage, the bank would apply to courts for a repossession order.

Carwyn Kawana was offered a deal in the Palmerston North District Court yesterday when he appeared to defend a charge of shoplifting from The Warehouse.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Mike Toon said Kawana was a man who stayed true to his word and offered to drop the charge in exchange for a vow to stay on the right side of the law.

CK had returned the goods, which the blog believes were removed from the shop as a symbolic gesture.

Kawana told the Judge:  “I will probably do it again, Your Honour.”

If they owe him the rent, then they should pay up!

He stole from the store when he went to to collect “rent” about six weeks after he delivered an eviction notice in July last year.

Kawana also issued eviction notices to Massey University, Linton Military Camp, Palmerston North City Council, and the Inland Revenue Department.

The judge said: “Higher courts than this have already made rulings on this argument.”

CK who wants his day in court told the judge:  “The judges that made the ruling before …  have not seen the new evidence I have in my bag.”

He is representing himself because “no-one in town will represent me,” the report said.

The court should first ask CK to produce his new evidence. If, having seen the evidence, they still insist he doesn’t own Palmerston North, then someone close to him MUST! It sure as hell didn’t belong to the current occupiers!

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Posted in eviction notice, land possession, Maori activist, Palmerston North | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Maori Leader Claiming Sacred Ancestoral Land Nabbed by NZ Gestapo

Posted by te2ataria on May 31, 2008

Iwi group’s bid to claim park fails

The Dominion Post | Saturday, 31 May 2008

A breakaway band of Rangitaane iwi has failed in a bid to claim Palmerston North’s Anzac Park for a marae. [Marae is a sacred place for religious and social purposes: Moderator]

The group of about 20 yesterday marched from The Square to the bush-covered hill reserve on the edge of the Manawatu River.

However, the protest ended when police arrested leader Carwyn Kawana for trespass. The rest of the group dispersed.

Mr Kawana vowed he would be back every day till his bloodlines got the land back.

He said a marae once stood on the land and it was also an old pa site and the “young warriors” wanted a marae to be built again to honour their ancestors.


A carved representation in contemporary style of Te Au-o-te-whenua, an ancestor of the Kawerau-ā-Maki people.

He was arrested after Palmerston North City Council representative Peter Eathorne asked them to leave and then read a trespass notice. [Not the riot act, surely! See Notes below: Moderator]

Mr Eathorne said Anzac Park would be shut to the public this weekend to manage the “issue”.

Last Friday, Mr Kawana’s group erected a carving in The Square but it was removed by the council. [Source]

© Fairfax New Zealand Limited 2007. All the material on this page has the protection of international copyright. All rights reserved. See NewZeelend Fair Use Notice!


Protest at NZ parliament over the New Zealand foreshore and seabed controversy. Image Credit: Armon, via Wikimedia Commons. GNU Free Documentation license V. 1.2 or later.

Notes:
I
wi
form the largest everyday social units in Māori populations. The word iwi means “people” or “folk”; in many contexts it might translate as “tribe” or as “clan.”

In the Māori language, iwi also means “bones”. The Māori author, Keri Hulme, named her best known (1985 Booker Prize) novel The Bone People, a title linked directly to the dual meaning of bone and “tribal people”. Māori may refer to returning home after travelling or living elsewhere as “going back to the bones” — literally to the burial-areas of the ancestors. Many societies might use the analogous concept of “roots”. (Source)

A marae (in New Zealand Māori, Cook Islands Maori, Tahitian) malaʻe (in Tongan), malae (in Samoan and Hawaiian), is a sacred place which served both religious and social purposes in pre-Christian Polynesian societies. In all these languages, the word also means “cleared, free of weeds, trees, etc.” It generally consists of an area of cleared land roughly rectangular (the marae itself), bordered with stones or wooden posts (called au in Tahitian and Cook Islands Māori) perhaps with terraces (paepae) which were used in olden times for ceremonial purposes; and with a central stone ahu or a’u (sometimes as in the Rapanui culture’s ahu on Easter Island “ahu” becomes a synonym for the whole marae complex). (Source)

The Riot Act (1 Geo. 1, c. 5) of 1714 was an act introduced by the Parliament of Great Britain authorising local authorities to declare any group of more than twelve people to be unlawfully assembled, and thus have to disperse or face punitive action. The Act, whose long title was “An act for preventing tumults and riotous assemblies, and for the more speedy and effectual punishing the rioters“, came into force on August 1, 1715, and remained on the statute books until 1973.

If a group of people failed to disperse within twenty minutes of the proclamation, the act provided that the authorities could use force to disperse them. Anyone assisting with the dispersal was specifically indemnified against any legal consequences in the event of any of the crowd being injured or killed. (Source)

Because of the broad authority that the act granted, it was used both for the maintenance of civil order and for political means. A particularly notorious use of the act was the Peterloo Massacre of 1819 in Manchester [15 people were killed and 400–700 were injured.]

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